YES, you can.

yesyoucan2Inspire someone today. I chose to write a book “Eddie Green The Rise of an Early 1900s Black American Entertainment Pioneer” to inspire my grandson. He was six when I came up with the idea, he is twenty-six today and the book just published in July of this year.

My very first post talked about the words “I can’t” because I heard that from my grandson a lot when he was little. Just so happens my father, who died when I was three, found success through talent and determination to escape the poverty he was born into. I figured his story would show my grandson that “you can” despite seeming obstacles.

Eddie’s rise from poverty played out mostly in the world of entertainment, with offshoots into the restaurant business. And the book became not only a book to inspire my grandson but a book about the entertainment business in the 1900s. Because Eddie was Black the book is also filled with information about other Blacks prominent in show business back in the day. It became sort of a Black Entertainment history book. So it became a book  about a Black man in America, as well as an inspirational book. People have told me the book should be required reading for young people in schools. So could also be seen as educational. My main group has proven to be people who follow entertainment nostalgia. Old time Hollywood, Old Time Radio shows, old all-black cast movies. A wide variety of folks, young and not so young.

yesyoucanMy desire to inspire my grandson with his great-grandfather’s story morphed into wanting to inspire any person who thinks “they can’t .” So I was blown away with the interest generated by this book in the Nostalgia field. I have discovered that a lot of people knew about, remembered and have actually seen my father perform. I have been made aware of the fact that there are young people  who are fascinated with success stories from the 1900s, for the very reason I wrote the book, inspiration. Also, I have happily realized the interest this book can garner in the Black community as a success story of a Black man, both personally and professionally, in a time of great racial discord.

I am going to put more energy also into sharing Eddie’s rags-to-riches story with as many people as possible, such as The young adult (YA) age group, or teen-group.  Because they are the future. They need to have access to stories that will give them hope. I hope to make this book available to younger children although it doesn’t have any colorful pictures. I also want to market to Black Ancestry sites because genealogy is a big deal today.

Sure, I want to sell a million books. My father’s first song sold a million copies in one year in 1919 (A Good Man is Hard to Find), and people are still recording it, imagine that! But this book began out of love for my grandson and grew into something I could share with people everywhere which makes me happy. And if I make lots of money I will be able to say that I am self-supporting through my own contributions.

In the late 1930s my father told a reporter that in his opinion “radio was a very, very difficult field for Negroes to get into, but the benefits were worth the try.” If he could see how effort has worked toward America having it’s first black President, I know he would be very proud.

Thanks, for stopping by.

 

 

Research in Black Culture-A Celebration

momwithfur (2)The latest good news is that the biography I have written about my father, Eddie Green, will now be featured in the Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture in New York.

The picture I have posted with Eddie and Mom (Norma) is in the Eddie Green Portrait Collection also at the Schomburg. I did not put this picture in the book because I do not own the photo. But I want to show it off here because these two look like they are enjoying the good life. Mom made her own hats back then. I don’t remember that fur coat but I do remember her fox fur stole. She kept it in that drawer that I wasn’t supposed to open.

If you have bought the book (thank you so much!!), you will see a picture of Eddie in a white suit and black tie, I was able to purchase a copy of the picture from the Schomburg and it works perfectly for my back cover.cropthisforpost (2)

As a filmmaker, movie and Broadway star and Old Time Radio Icon, Eddie was always sharp. He was a good business man. He was well-read. Eddie travelled with his books. He had his own library at the Hudson Theater in New York. They say a lot of those old time vaudeville actors read a lot of the classics in order to come up with ideas to incorporate into their funny skits, similar to a reference to Shakespeare’s Hamlet that was used in an old Three Stooges movie:

” Among the insane sights in this Stooges short is a burro wearing galoshes. The burro is named “Yorick,” and when it appears it was accidentally blown up, yes, we hear: “Alas, poor Yorick. We knew him well.”

Eddie was a comedian. A good comedian. He was funny, someone said he could not open his mouth without being funny. He didn’t mind acting funny, either.eddiegreensillyphotoas he did in his movie One Round Jones.

Over the time it took for me to write the book, I have had a number of people tell me that Eddie is looking down at me and smiling (even the lady who has my first consignment said it). I don’t know if this is so, but if it is he can now be proud that in 2016 both of our works are housed together in the same public access building in New York. I know I am proud. Thank you Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture.

And thank you, for stopping by and celebrating with me.

 

 

 

IF IT WAS NOT FOR EDWARD

myfamblyIf it wasn’t for Edward, I may not have written a book about my father.

My father’s birth name was Edward and he later changed it to Eddie. My grandson’s birth name is Edward (for reasons other than what one might think), and he later began to go by Eddie. The picture on this post is Melony (my gorgeous daughter), Edward (aka Eddie) and me, Grandma. Edward is about 24 in this picture and he was about six years old when I conceived the idea to write a book. This picture was taken about two years ago and my book has been published as of this past June.

My father, Eddie Green, died when I was a little child. I grew up with the knowledge that he had been “somebody” in the entertainment industry, but it had never been paramount in my mind. As a youngster I wanted to be an entertainer, I wanted to be a singer and entertain the world. When I thought I had said something funny, I would tell my mother it was because Eddie (the comedian) was my father. But I never wanted to write a book about my father.

I became aware as I got older that my father had been a successful man, as an actor, a composer, filmmaker, singer and Old Time Radio personality, especially as he was a Black man coming along in an era of major struggles for Black people trying to get into show business. Still, I did not consider writing a book. I was proud of the fact that my father had been in show business. I was proud of the fact that he wrote the song “A Good Man is Hard to Find”. I even heard Alberta Hunter singing the song on the Jazz radio station in Los Angeles in the 80s. Cool.

And then Melony had Edward. And then Edward began school, which meant homework. Nobody likes homework. Homework is hard. I think Edward is a genius now, but back then he had trouble with homework and when he was told to do his homework, he would say “I can’t”! Well, what grandma wants their grandkid to grow up thinking they can’t? So, I got the brilliant idea to use my father, his great-grandfather, as an example of what a person CAN do, no matter what. And so began the process of research.

Little did I know that Eddie’s career as an entertainer and as an entrepreneur was far greater than I had thought. His life story truly was inspiring. And could inspire other people struggling with the seeming difficulties in life. The fact that Eddie was a Black man born in 1891 who attained certain heights in what was seen as a White man’s world just made his story more awe-inspiring, to me. Being a modern Black woman, I had to get over my feelings of discomfort when I saw my father in black-face on stage on television,  I researched the issue and gained a better understanding of why. But the fact that my father is one of the first Black men to be  on the first RCA-NBC 1936 test demonstrations of television BLOWS me away. The man is on the internet today! He looks funny, but if it had not been for people like Eddie back then, Blacks would probably not be where they are today. If it had not been for people like Eddie, who rose against all odds, I would not have this story to tell to provide motivation to anyone who needs it.

If it had not been for Edward, my grandson, I may not have known that I could write a book. He told me after the book was written that “no matter what else happens, just remember that you wrote the book”.  (He is a genius) And that was the point. To write a book demonstrating a persons ability to achieve success in their endeavors, no matter what.

Wow, I was long-winded today. Hey, thanks for stopping by.

 

SUNDAY SPECIAL

meonradio yesterdayusaGet ready, get ready, get ready. I am following in my father’s footsteps. On Sunday, July 31, at 7:30PM, I am going to be interviewed on an internet radio station with regard to my new book! Eddie, my father, was an Old Time Radio icon who appeared for ten years on the Duffy’s Tavern radio show, as well as appearing on The Radio Hall of Fame, Stage Door Canteen and many others. In his own words he was “one who knows the radio business.” In a letter he wrote to a radio station back in 1938 he introduced himself like this: “I am known in big time radio from coast to coast.”

Well, I am not known from coast to coast, yet, but I am working on it. Actually, I take that back, I am in L. A. and I do have a follower in Maine. Anywho, this will be the second interview I have done with this radio program which is hosted by John and Larry Gassman and Walden Hughes. The first interview was before my book was published.  Please tune in and enjoy the show. Just go online and enter Yesterday USA (see above photo) and click on either Red or Blue.

I like sharing my book writing journey here on WP. I am still surprised that I have finished writing the book.

I have just received my copy and looking through it and seeing the pictures and the index and all the chapters put together is like receiving a present from someone.Eddie Green -Social Media

I suggest if you have a desire to put a story in book form, do it!

Thanx again, for stopping by.

 

GOING PLACES

Eddie Green Cover Image composit
Eddie Green

I love this portrait. I found it online one day while looking for information for my book. At that time I had one head shot of my father that had been given to me by my mother for my 40th birthday, and a few pictures I had found at online auctions and in newspapers. I was so excited to see this portrait that I contacted the artist and thanked him. He sent me the portrait! He’s a fan. Well, this portrait will be featured on the front cover of my book, along with the title, Eddie Green The Rise of an Early 1900s Black American Entertainment Pioneer, and my name, of course.

The finished product is in the works as I write this.

I am fortunate to have a good number of followers of this blog, some for a long time and some very recent. For the more recent followers, this blog has pretty much been about my book writing journey regarding my father, Eddie Green who was a prominent moviemaker, film star, Old Time Radio icon and beloved comedian active in the early 1900s, but whose name became buried in the sands of time. I have spent years researching and in February of 2015 I bought my first laptop for the specific reason of writing my book which will be published this year. I will post a copy of the front and back covers on the book when I receive my completed copy.

The covers depict Eddie in white coat and black tie (he was always sharp), and it reminds me of the fact that he frequently emceed floor shows, also. Especially after he became famous as Eddie, the waiter on the Old Time Radio show Duffy’s Tavern. For instance, during the Spring of 1947 he emceed the 68th Anniversary of the leadership of Charlotta A. Bass of the California Eagle newspaper (In 1952, Bass became the first African-American woman nominated for Vice President, as a candidate of the Progressive Party.)

One of the performers in that floor show was Mabel Fairbanks, a Black ice skating star. Ms. Fairbanks performed in the 1930s through the 1940s, but because she was Black she was denied the chance to compete in the national qualifying events for the Olympics, though she did tour nationally. In 1997 she became the first African American to be inducted into the U. S. Figure Skating Hall of Fame. Today we have 19-year-old Simone Biles who has become the first woman to win four consecutive U. S. all-around titles in 42 years and who will be attending the Olympics in Rio de Janeiro. It all blends together and becomes relevant to today’s generation.

All you wonderful people out there, I welcome comments, anecdotes or neighborly hellos, and tell your friends to check me out, cause we are going places.

Thanx, for stopping by, and keep coming back.

 

 

 

An Update and a little Background

Yesterday, November 14, I attended my first writer’s convention of Old Time Radio (OTR) fans.  Basically, I went because a writer friend was putting on a presentation that included information on my father, Eddie Green.  My friend surprised me by introducing me and suggesting that people get my card (I will have another post on how I almost did not have any cards) in case they could help me with my research for the book I am writing about my father. After the presentation, I was invited to participate in a future interview on an internet radio program!  Talk about being blown away (of course I didn’t show it).  It was just the boost I needed.

My father, Eddie Green, was the man who coined the term and wrote the song “A Good Man Is Hard To Find” in 1917.  He was 21 years old (supposedly).  He had come from an extremely poor background in Baltimore where he was born in 1896 or 1891 depending on which documents I have uncovered.  Though he became a well-known entertainer and entrepreneur from the east to the west coast, he has since faded into obscurity.  Some people do, however, remember Eddie from his ten year career as “Eddie, the Waiter” on the “Duffy’s Tavern” radio program from which he retired due to ill health in 1950.  The book about my father is to, hopefully, inspire others to the pursuit of achievement despite obstacles.

My Father:329