Misery Does Not Love Company

For the last couple of weeks I have been running on empty. It’s not new for me. Periodically, I slow way down. Family issues, world events, self-doubt and other issues overwhelm me. But, my misery does not love company, besides, everybody has problems. The day after Christmas I went out and seemed like everybody was pissed off. And today because of the snow back east a newscaster was talking about a “misery map”.  Anywho, this is my reason for not posting lately.  So, while looking for a photo on Google Advanced Images for this blog I typed in “Misery Loves Company: and got “the freeze”. Because I have such a weird sense of humor this picture cracked me up. This guy looks miserable. The fact that I laughed when I saw this picture lets me know I am still my old self-silly. And I am not as miserable as he looks. In fact, January has started off well for me (I had the best day with my daughter and her honey) and I do hope this year brings all of you happiness.

I have multiple library presentations coming up. I have met two lovely people, one who is going to help me genealogy-wise, and the other I will be helping with their social media needs. At the end of the month I will have a YouTube video up and running promoting my book. I discovered that a television station in Staunton, Va. aired my father’s last movie Mr. Adam’s Bomb as recent as 1983 and I have sent off an email trying to find out if they have knowledge of a physical copy of the movie. Meanwhile…..

I want to touch on a subject that is important to me. Today is the birthday of Zora Neale Hurston. She was born the same year that my father, Eddie Green, was born. She was born in Alabama, and moved to Eatonville, Florida, with her family in 1894. Eatonville would become the setting for many of her stories and is now the site of the Zora! Festival, held each year in her honor. Incorporated on August 15, 1887, Eatonville was one of the first self-governing all-black municipalities in the United States. I saw this quote from her online today and it touched something in me. She wrote these words in her 1950 essay, What White Publishers Won’t Print. “For various reasons, the average, struggling, non-morbid Negro is the best-kept secret in America.”

There is more, of course, but these words spoke to me. They said what I feel, that I am simply an average, struggling, female human being who happens to be Black and who just wants to live the best life I can. I go to work. I’ve raised a child. I pay bills.  I’m not pissed off because I am Black. I just am who I am. I decide what I want or need to do and I do it. Eddie was like that. When he was asked about Blacks being able to get into radio back in the 30s he said: “Radio for Negroes is a very hard field to get into . . . very hard! But the returns are so great that it’s worth the try.” Commenting further he also said: He found one thing to be true, “Talent is appreciated . . . you get respect if you know your business.” Eddie also said: “If you’ve got the talent, you can’t miss in the long run, even if it’s mighty long!”

It’s about living life.  Find something you like to do, and do that the best you know how. Treat others the way you want to be treated. And smile, brother, smile. Because “Misery” does not love company.

Thanks, for stopping by. KCB

Check out my Facebook Book Page: https://www.facebook.com/elvagreenbookpage/

Thanks Wikipedia.

 

 

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Totally Inspirational

meandedward
Me and My Grandson, Edward

A little over a year ago, I posted my first blog with these words:

Dean Koontz once said, “I really believe that everyone has a talent, ability or skill that he can mine to support himself and to succeed in life.”

I found this quote while doing research for a book I will eventually complete.  I began my research in about 1998 because my then small grandson’s favorite word seemed to be “I can’t.” Usually in regard to why he did not finish his homework. His homework was always too hard. I came up with the bright idea to enlighten him on what a person can accomplish, by telling him about, and by writing a book for him, about my father, his grandfather, Edward (Eddie) Green, who was a black man born in poverty in 1896 and who rose to prominence despite many obstacles.  

 

Today, as you can see from the above picture, my grandson is no longer small, and I have completed the book. I have to say that my bright idea has also been good for me, in that I have gained a bigger and better understanding myself, of just how hard Eddie had to work to get where he got. For instance, in the above paragraph I have 1896 as Eddie’s birthdate, well, just last year I discovered that Eddie was really born in 1891 (SS application), so I guess he figured the age thing was a factor in getting ahead. Especially in entertainment, which is where Eddie’s talents took him. We all have this ability in one way or another.

When I began this blog I said I wanted to inspire people. I thought I would post poetry from time to time. Totally got away from that idea, because sharing my father’s ups and downs became paramount. Unfortunately, though I have gotten to the point in my posting that I have to slow down on what I share about Eddie or there will be no point to writing the book.  My posts so far have touched on instances in Eddie’s life up until 1945 and he died in 1950. I will continue posting on Eddie and my book writing adventure, but today I am going to post a poem written by my brother, Brian.

Brian’s many talents include writing poetry. I asked Brian early on to write a poem for me, but he wanted to write on a religious theme. I told him that this was not a religious blog, that it was about inspiring people. Haha, don’t laugh. Anyhow, I have realized during my research that people are inspired in many different ways, through many different pathways. Brian is a  funny guy (we have different fathers, but his father was the “life of the party” kind of comedian), Brian has a passion for writing poetry. Give him a word and you’ve got a poem. He loves to read and will pull out his pocket bible, or his latest historical article, in a minute. Today, before he got interested in the Super Bowl, I asked him to give me a poem over the phone, and I got one. Interesting that today  just happens to be a Sunday.

UNTITLED

It’s so good to know that even in the midst of our experience in this mortal life, Thank you Jesus is our reply, cause everything’s going to be alright!

So many things going on in our lives, can’t wait to fret something in a hurry! Remember the Lord said, Calm down, do not worry!

I wrote this to say my message is all about him; all the loving ways he is, we can do nothing without him.

Poem by:  Brian Beasley

Thanks, for stopping by.